Manuscript Journeys

The idea of this blog is to create a metaphoric journey that, through manuscripts, will take us to different centuries, cultures, places and themes.

This blog is curated by Rromir Imami - Digital Communication professional for Cultural Heritage with passion to bring manuscript culture closer to wider audiences.

nybg:

Decrypting the Most Mysterious Book in the World

In the six or so centuries that it’s been floating around, bouncing from scholar to scholar and occasionally disappearing for decades at a time, the Voynich manuscript (as it’s come to be called) has yet to be translated. That might be due to the fact that it’s written in a language no one’s ever seen before or since.

But it does have some grounding in the reality that we know, namely via the dozens of familiar plant species sketched throughout the pages of this manuscript. And some researchers think these botanical illustrations are integral to cracking the code that, as one expert put it, has proven “academic suicide” for so many scholars throughout the ages. Click through for the full story! —MN

erikkwakkel:

Doodle by bored medieval school boy
This 15th-century doodle is found in the lower margin of a manuscript containing Juvenal’s Satires. This classical text was a popular device to teach young students - kids - morals. The medieval teacher Alexander Nequam stated: “Let the student read the satirists […] so that he may learn even in his younger days that vices are to be shunned” (quote here). Spoken like a true optimist, because this page shows what young school boys like to do with rules: disobey them. And so in stead of studying the student who used this book drew a funny doodle in the lower margin: a figure with a flower in one hand and what appears to be a pipe in the other. Could it be his teacher? Doodles are of all ages but those produced by bored school kids are the most entertaining.
Pic: Carpentras, Bibliothèque municipale, MS 368 (here). Here is another example of school kids doodling.

erikkwakkel:

Doodle by bored medieval school boy

This 15th-century doodle is found in the lower margin of a manuscript containing Juvenal’s Satires. This classical text was a popular device to teach young students - kids - morals. The medieval teacher Alexander Nequam stated: “Let the student read the satirists […] so that he may learn even in his younger days that vices are to be shunned” (quote here). Spoken like a true optimist, because this page shows what young school boys like to do with rules: disobey them. And so in stead of studying the student who used this book drew a funny doodle in the lower margin: a figure with a flower in one hand and what appears to be a pipe in the other. Could it be his teacher? Doodles are of all ages but those produced by bored school kids are the most entertaining.

Pic: Carpentras, Bibliothèque municipale, MS 368 (here). Here is another example of school kids doodling.

sergendry:

The Last of the Great Chained Libraries by Jenny Weston

During the later middle ages, more and more people were interested in reading, and chained libraries provided an excellent resource for those who could not afford to purchase books themselves. The system of locking the books to the room, thus allowed the public free access to read, while at the same time safe-guarding the library’s valuable collection from potential thieves.

(via jcervant1)

nunc-vitae:

Splendor Solis
The Arms of The Art

nunc-vitae:

Splendor Solis

The Arms of The Art

rromir:

From the visit to the Martin Bodmer Foundation in Geneva on Flickr.
petitcabinetdecuriosites:

Compendium absolutissium totius summae theologiae (by Hopkins Rare Books, Manuscripts, & Archives)

petitcabinetdecuriosites:

Compendium absolutissium totius summae theologiae (by Hopkins Rare Books, Manuscripts, & Archives)

(via heaveninawildflower)

queequegscoffin:

Beowulf manuscript - first leaf

queequegscoffin:

Beowulf manuscript - first leaf

(via tamerlian67)

e-codices:

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 23, p. 184 on Flickr.
Manuscript title: Folchart Psalter (Psalterium Gallicanum with Cantica) Manuscript summary: The Folchart Psalter, a masterpiece of late Carolingian illumination. Origin: St. Gall (Switzerland) Period: 9th century Image source: St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 23: Folchart Psalter (Psalterium Gallicanum with Cantica) ( www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/list/one/csg/0023 )

e-codices:

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 23, p. 184 on Flickr.

Manuscript title: Folchart Psalter (Psalterium Gallicanum with Cantica)

Manuscript summary: The Folchart Psalter, a masterpiece of late Carolingian illumination.

Origin: St. Gall (Switzerland)

Period: 9th century

Image source: St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 23: Folchart Psalter (Psalterium Gallicanum with Cantica)
( www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/list/one/csg/0023 )

medieval:

St. Luke
The Book of Deer (Evangelia) is a Gospel Book written in a hand that was current in the period c. 850-1000 and generally dated to the first half of the tenth century.

via

medieval:

St. Luke

The Book of Deer (Evangelia) is a Gospel Book written in a hand that was current in the period c. 850-1000 and generally dated to the first half of the tenth century.

via

demonagerie:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des manuscrits, Français 8266, detail of f. 7r. Pierre Le Baut, Compillation des Cronicques et ystores des Bretons, partie en III livretz (15th century)

demonagerie:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des manuscrits, Français 8266, detail of f. 7r. Pierre Le Baut, Compillation des Cronicques et ystores des Bretons, partie en III livretz (15th century)

(via medieval)